Bufferbloat and Other Challenges

Vint Cerf wrote a wonderful piece on the problems I’ve been wrestling with the last number of years, called “Bufferbloat and Other Internet Challenges“. It is funny how one thing leads to another; I started just wanting my home network to work as I knew it should, and started turning over rocks. The swamp we’re in is very deep and dangerous, the security problem the worst of all (and given how widespread bufferbloat is, that’s saying something). The “Other Challenges” dwarf bufferbloat, as large a problem as it is.

I gave a lunch talk at the Berkman Center at Harvard in June on the situation and recommend people read the articles by Bruce Schneier and Dan Geer you will find linked there, which is their takes on the situation I laid out to them (both articles were triggered by the information in that talk).

Dan Geer’s piece is particularly important from a policy perspective.

I also recommend reading “Familiarity Breeds Contempt: The Honeymoon Effect and the Role of Legacy Code in Zero-Day Vulnerabilities“, by Clark, Fry, Blaze and Smith, which makes clear to me that our engineering processes need fundamental reform in the face of very long lived devices. Vulnerability discovery looks very different than normal bug discovery; good examples include heartbleed and shellshock (which thankfully does not affect most such embedded devices, since the ash shell is used in busybox).

In my analysis of the ecosystem, it’s clear that binary blobs are a real long term hazard, and do even short term damage by freezing the ecosystem for devices on old, obsolete software, magnifying the scale of vulnerabilities even on new equipment. But in the long term maintenance and security of devices (examples include your modems and home routers) is nigh impossible. And all devices need ongoing software updates for the life of the devices; the routing devices most of all (since if the network ceases to work, updates become impossible).

“Friends don’t let friends run factory firmware”.

Be safe.

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