Home products that fix/mitigate bufferbloat…

My New Years resolution is to restart blogging.jigsawfish2

Bufferbloat is the most common underlying cause of most variable bad performance on the Internet; it is called “lag” by gamers.

Trying to steer anything the size of the Internet into a better direction is very slow and difficult at best. From the time changes in the upstream operating systems are complete to when consumers can buy new product is typically four years caused by the broken and insecure ecosystem in the embedded device market. Chip vendors, box vendors, I’m looking at you… So much of what is now finally appearing in the market is based on work that is often four years old. Market pull may do what push has not.

See What to do About Bufferbloat for general information. And the DSLReports Speedtest makes it easy to test for bufferbloat. But new commercial products are becoming increasingly available.  Here’s some of them.

Introduction

The fq_codel & cake work going on in the bufferbloat project is called SQM – “smart queue management.” This SQM work is specifically targeted at mitigating the bufferbloat in the “last mile,” your cable/DSL/fiber connection, by careful queue management and an artificial bandwidth bottleneck added in your home router (since most modems do no perform flow control to the home router, unfortunately).

Modems require built in AQM algorithms, such as those just beginning to reach the market in DOCSIS 3.1. I just ordered one of these for my house to see if it functions better than the SQM mitigation (almost certainly not), but at least these should not require the manual tuning that SQM does.

To fix bufferbloat in WiFi requires serious changes in the WiFi driver in your home router (which typically runs Linux), and in your device (laptop/phone/tablet).  The device driver work was first released as part of the LEDE project, in January 2017 for initially just a couple of WiFi chip types.

Evenroute IQrouter

First up, I’d like call out the Evenroute IQrouter, which has a variant of SQM that deals with “sag”.

DSL users have often suffered more than other broadband users, due to bad bloat in the modems compounded by minimal bandwidth, so the DSL version of the IQrouter is particularly welcome.   Often DSL ISP’s seem to have the tendency (seemingly more often than ISPs with other technologies) to under provision their back haul, causing “sag” at different times of day/week.  This makes the static configuration techniques we’ve used in LEDE/OpenWrt SQM ineffective, as you have to give away too much bandwidth if a fixed bandwidth is used.  I love the weasel words “up to” some speed used by many ISPs. It is one thing for your service to degrade for a short period of days or weeks while an ISP takes action to provision more bandwidth to an area; it is another for your bandwidth to routinely vary by large factors for weeks/months and years.

I sent a DSL Evenroute IQrouter to my brother in Pennsylvania recently and arranged for one for a co-worker, and they are working well, and Rich Brown has had similarly good experiences. Evenroute has been working hard to make the installation experience easy. Best yet, is that the IQrouter is autoconfiguring and figures out for you what to do in the face of “sag” in your Internet service, something that may be a “killer feature” if you suffer lots of “sag” from your ISP. The IQrouter is therefore the first “out of the box” device I can recommend to almost anyone, rather than just my geek friends.

The IQRouter does not yet have the very recent wonderful WiFi results of Toke and Dave (more about coming this in a separate post), but has the capability for over the air updates and one hopes debloated WiFi and ATF will come to it reasonably soon. The new WiFi stack is just going upstream into Linux and LEDE/OpenWRT as I write this post. DSL users seldom have enough bandwidth for the WiFi hop to be the bottleneck; so the WiFi work is much more important for Cable and fiber users at higher bandwidth than for DSL users stuck at low bandwidth.

The Evenroute is effective on all technologies, not just DSL. It is just particularly important for DSL users, which suffer from sag more than most…

Ubiquiti Edgerouter

I’ve bought an Ubiquiti Edgerouter X on recommendation of Dave Taht but not yet put it into service. Router performance can be an issue on high end cable or fiber service. It is strictly an Ethernet router, lacking WiFi interfaces; but in my house, where the wiring is down in the basement, that’s what I need.  The Edgerouter starts at around $50; the POE version I bought around $75.

The Edgerouter story is pretty neat – Dave Taht did the backport 2? years back. Ubiquti’s user community jumped all over it and polished it up, adding support to their conf tools and GUI, and Ubiquiti recognized what they had and shipped it as part of their next release.

SQM is available in recent releases of Ubituiti’s Edgerouter firmware.  SQM itself is easy to configure. But the Edgerouter overall requires considerable configuration before it is useful in the home environment, however, and its firmware web interface is aimed at IT people rather than most home users. I intend this to replace my primary router TP-Link Archer C7v2 someday soon, as it is faster than the TP-Link since Comcast keeps increasing my bandwidth without asking me.  I wish the Ubiquiti had a “make me into a home router” wizard that would make it immediately usable for most people, as its price is low enough for some home users to be interested in it.   I believe one can install LEDE/OpenWrt on the Edgerouter, which I may do if I find its IT staff oriented web interface too unusable.

LEDE/OpenWrt and BSD for the Geeks

If you are adventurous enough to reflash firmware, anything runnable on OpenWrt/LEDE of the last few years has SQM available. You take the new LEDE release for a spin. If your router has an Ath9k WiFi chip (or a later version of the Ath10k WiFi chip), or you buy a new router with the right chips in them, you can play with the new WiFi goodness now in LEDE (noted above). There is a very wide variety of home routers that can benefit from reflashing. Its web UI is tolerably decent, better than many commercial vendors I have seen.

WiFi chip vendors should take careful note of the stupendous improvements available in the Linux mac802.11 framework for bufferbloat elimination and air time fairness. If you don’t update to the new interfaces and get your code into LEDE, you’re going to be at a great disadvantage to Atheros in the market.

dd-wrt, asuswrt, ipfire, all long ago added support for SQM. It will be interesting to see how long it takes them to pick up the stunning WiFi work.

The pcengines APU2 is a good “DIY” router for higher speeds. Dave has not yet tried LEDE on it yet, but will. He uses it presently on Ubuntu….

BSD users recently got fq_codel in opnsense, so the BSD crowd are making progress.

Other Out of the Box Devices

The Turris Omnia is particularly interesting for very fast broadband service and can run LEDE as well; but unfortunately,  it seems only available in Europe at this time.  We think the Netduma router has SQM support, though it is not entirely clear what they’ve done; it is a bit pricey for my taste, and I don’t happen to know anyone who has one.

Cable Modems

Cable users may find that upgrading to a new DOCSIS 3.1 modem is helpful (though that does not solve WiFi bufferbloat).  The new DOCSIS 3.1 standard requires AQM.  While I don’t believe PIE anywhere as good as fq_codel (lacking flow queuing), the DOCSIS 3.1 standard at least requires an AQM, and PIE should help and does not require manual upstream bandwidth tuning.  Maybe someday we’ll find some fq_codel (or fq_pie) based cable modems.  Here’s hoping…

Under the Covers, Hidden

Many home routers vendors make bold claims they have proprietary cool features, but these are usually smoke and mirrors. Wireless mesh devices without bufferbloat reduction are particularly suspect and most likely to require manual RF engineering beyond most users. They require very high signal strength and transfer rates to avoid the worst of bufferbloat. Adding lots more routers without debloating and not simultaneously attacking transmit power control is a route to WiFi hell for everyone. The LEDE release is the first to have the new WiFi bits needed to make wireless mesh more practical. No one we know of has been working on minimizing transmit power to reduce interference between mesh nodes. So we are very skeptical of these products.

There are now a rapidly increasing number of products out there with SQM goodness under the covers, sometimes implemented well, and sometimes not so well, and more as the months go by.

One major vendor put support for fq_codel/SQM under the covers of one product using a tradename, promptly won an award, but then started using that tradename on inferior products in their product line that did not have real queue management. I can’t therefore vouch for any product line tradename that does not acknowledge publicly how it works and that the tradename means that it really has SQM under the covers. Once burned, three times shy. That product therefore does not deserve a mention due to the behavior of the vendor. “Bait and switch” is not what anyone needs.

Coming Soon…

We have wind of a number of vendors’ plans who have not quite reached the market, but it is up to them to announce their products.

If you find new products or ISP’s that do really well, let us know, particularly if they actually say what they are doing. We need to start some web pages to keep track of commercial products.

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